Past Program Summaries

2013 Cash and Care for Wellness Program 

Thanks to a grant from NovoNordisk and support from the African American Art & Culture Complex in San Francisco, California, Dance Out Diabetes continued to be the most innovative way to prevent and manage diabetes. It has garnered national attention.

The program brought the clinic to the dance floor with a monthly culture odyssey of dance, access to certified diabetes educators (CDEs), qualified dance instructors, and we incentivized it! Yes, people got paid to show up, get screened and enjoy a light dance in the company of friendly volunteer staff and participants. In addition, we had a Wellness Program that allowed participants to access dance videos, educational resources, enter personal health metrics and ask a certified diabetes educator (CDE) a question in between the dances.

Program Statistics & Results: looking back 3 years

We hired an outcomes expert who thoroughly analyzed our data. She made improvements to the way we collect information. As such, comparing past year-to-year outcomes was a challenge as the system in which we gathered information was not identical for years 2011-2013.

2011

2012

2013

Total Participants

121

301

110***

% Follow-up (completed at least 2 classes)

14%

25%

42%

People with diabetes or pre-diabetes

54%

31%

58%

Friends, family or other support in attendance

*

34%

25%

Volunteers and other healthcare providers

*

35%

17%

% Non-white

90%

73%

64%

% women

75%

89%

73%

% type 1

*

*

4%

2011

2012

2013

% who lowered or maintained A1C < 7

*

95%

88%

Average change in A1C

*

-0.34**

-0.12

Average change in Systolic Blood Pressure

*

*

-2.11

Incentives for participants to complete dance and screenings (gave $10-30 value per dance in carrot cash for local farmers’ markets, Safeway cards, iTunes cards and 24 hour fitness gym cards)

$2,840

* Data collection measures not standardized early on in our existence.
** The mean A1C change was -0.34, and for those who reduced A1C, the mean drop was 0.49.
***2013 did not have a dance-a-thon, so we did not have as many one time attendees as we did  in 2012, but our follow-up rates were significantly higher in 2013 as were the metrics performed. See next chart below.

Health Metrics Performed

What was checked 2011 2012 2013         
A1C 83 140 191
Glucose 168 271 535
Blood pressure 116 188 398
Heights/weights 110 145 288
Waist circumference 135 271

2013 Outcome Detail

The change in biomarkers for all participants in 2013 included the following:

All Participants Baseline Last Change p
BMI 29.69 29.94 0.25 0.472
Waist 39.08 39.14 0.07 0.876
Confidence 4.20 4.32 0.12 0.610
A1C 6.06 5.94 -0.12 0.303
Systolic 127.81 125.70 -2.12 0.389

 

High Risk and Diagnosed Baseline Last Change p
BMI 30.63 31.14 0.51 0.308
Waist 40.28 40.20 -0.08 0.880
Confidence 4.11 4.21 0.11 0.732
A1C 6.47 6.25 -0.21 0.207
Systolic 132.38 130.38 -2.00 0.536
Diastolic 79.34 78.03 -1.31 0.487
  • 57.5% of all participants maintained or decreased their weight (a little over half).
    Since most adults gain weight annually, this is an important outcome.

Summarizing 2013 Data

In 2013, our follow-up rates increased to 42% (compared to 25% in 2012). We think this is because we incentivized the program. One third of participants attended 5 or more of the monthly classes with 2 male participants having perfect follow-up rates. In addition:

  • 150 people with diabetes accessed our wellness program (some from across the United States)
  • $5,020 went back to participants as incentives for program completion (carrot cash to spend at local farmers’ markets, Safeway cards, iTunes cards and local gym cards).

In terms of A1C, we had a mean reduction of -0.21 in those with pre-diabetes and diabetes.

The A1C outcome on our participants’ friends and family was noteworthy. Our model encourages the person with diabetes to bring their circle of support, many of whom opted in to the health screenings. Diabetes is less burdensome if you have someone to lean on, yet most exercise programs isolate the person with diabetes away from the very support that can be the inspiration to get there. In this case it had a double benefit. Since many participants belong to populations at high risk for diabetes, we were able to capture high-risk individuals for early intervention.

This is significant in helping our at-risk members who might not have sought screening without this intervention. The earlier in the disease state action is taken, the better chance of prevention and long-term control.

That’s it! Dance Out Diabetes welcomes ALL people with diabetes and their circle of support. We are excited about these outcomes and look forward to 2014 outcomes.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

2012 Dance Off Your Weight Program 

Thanks to a grant from Aetna Foundation and support from the African American Art & Culture Complex in San Francisco, California, Dance Out Diabetes accomplished significant results during the 2012 program aimed at preventing and managing diabetes through dance, education, support and increased access to care.

The heart of the program provided:
▪       Access to certified diabetes educators (CDEs), qualified dance instructors, a variety of dance genres, DJ freestyle dance music, and basic diabetes education (including a monthly “Weigh Wise” weight management article).
▪       A monthly, structured dance program in a friendly environment that promoted safety and ongoing support.
▪       Measurement of health metrics, demographics, and quality of life.
▪       Referral information to primary care physicians and endocrinologists and ongoing interaction between the dances with the online Wellness Program.

Results Summary

The Dance Out Diabetes Dance Off Your Weight program allowed 301 community members to access certified diabetes educators and learn about their risk for diabetes while helping others manage the condition. The program had 43 people with diabetes or pre-diabetes, 40 volunteers, and 9 certified diabetes educators. The amount of support people in attendance was staggering at 48, demonstrating the interest of family and friends to show support to their loved one with or at-risk for diabetes. (Many participants signed the consent form but were not completely screened or opted out of sharing their metrics.)

Participants included: 73% non-Caucasians, 93% adults, 7% children, 89% women, and 11% men. Out
of 140 A1Cs taken, 95% of attendees lowered or maintained A1C <7%, with an average decrease of 0.49%! 57% lost or maintained weight with an average decrease in BMI of 1.28. The average drop in systolic blood pressure was 9.47 mmHg with an average drop in diastolic of 4 mmHg. The average blood glucose drop from before to after the dance was 20 mg/dl.

Our Most Impressive Results:

  •  95% of attendees lowered or maintained A1C <7%, with an average decrease of 0.49%. The mean A1C change was -0.34!

  • 57% lost or maintained weight with an average decrease in BMI of 1.28.

On top of all these excellent results, the average monthly attendees was 25, surpassing the target goal average of 20/month. Also, 500 logged in to view the livestream of the November dance-a-thon!

More Details

Demographic findings (note: not all add up to 301 as participants left some areas blank)
▪    Participant total, age, gender: 301 total;
adults 93% (most age 19-64); children 7% (less than age 19);
females 89%, males 11%
▪    Diabetes type: 25 people with type 2 diabetes; 4 with type 1; 11 with prediabetes; 3 with gestational
▪    Support: 48 attendees came to support others with the disease. This is a significant finding showing the need for programs that include the support system for people with diabetes.
▪    Ethnic / racial breakdown:
19% African Americans (S.F. population 6%)
33% Asian Americans/Middle Eastern (S.F. population 31%)
19% Hispanic/Latinos (S.F. population 15%)
27% White/Caucasian (S.F. population 55%)
2% American Indian/Alaskan (S.F. population 1%).
▪    Special characteristics: 5 LGBT (lesbian gay bisexual transgender), 5 ESL (Tagolog, Spanish, Hindi and Gujarath).

Returning Participants

▪       Return Rate: 25% in 2012 vs.14% in 2011
▪       Exercise: 21% reported increasing exercise more than 50% over baseline since starting the program.
▪       Weight: 57% lost or maintained weight.
▪       BMI: Average decrease in BMI of 1.28.
▪       Waist Circumference: Average decrease in waist circumference of 2.73 inches.
▪       A1C: 95% of attendees lowered or maintained A1C <7%. Average decrease of 0.49%.
▪       Blood pressure: Average drop in systolic 9.47 mmHg. Average drop in diastolic 4 mmHg.

See our Post Program Evaluation Survey Summary here.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

2011 “First Steps” for At Risk Populations Program

Thanks to a grant from Aetna Foundation and support from the Bayview Hunters point Y in San Francisco, California, Dance Out Diabetes accomplished significant results during our 2011 program aimed at preventing and managing diabetes through dance and education.

The heart of the program provided:

  • Access to certified diabetes educators (CDEs), qualified dance instructors, a variety of dance genres, DJ freestyle dance music, and basic diabetes education (including a monthly “Nutrition in Motion” article which highlighted a particular food-type with a recipe).
  • A monthly, structured dance program in a friendly environment that promoted safety and ongoing support.
  • Measurement of health metrics, demographics, and quality of life.

Participant objectives associated with goals include:

  • A1C (3-month average glucose) maintenance to American Diabetes Association (ADA) goal of 7% (8% for very young and the elderly)
  • Weight reduction of 5% for those with a BMI of 30 or higher
  • Blood pressure (BP) improvements for those above ADA goal of 130/80
  • Reported improvement in quality of life

Results Summary

The Dance Out Diabetes First Steps program allowed 121 at-risk community members to access certified diabetes educators and learn about their risk for diabetes while helping others manage the condition. The program had 41% of people with diabetes or pre-diabetes, 13% with unknown type, as well as many volunteers, and 6 certified diabetes educators. The amount of support people in attendance was staggering at 34%, demonstrating the interest of family and friends to show support to their loved one with or at-risk for diabetes. Participants included 90% non-Caucasians, 88% adults, 12% children, 75% women, and 25% men (and 1 in transition/transgender).  Health metrics performed included 83 A1Cs, 168 glucose checks, 116 blood pressures and 110 heights / weights. The post program average A1C was an impressive 5.8%. Additionally, 93% of returning participants maintained or lost weight and 80% increased exercise frequency. For those with blood pressures above the goal of less than 130/80, 77% of returning participants lowered blood pressure. Glucose lowered on average of 20 points. Aside from the positive medical outcomes, participants had fun while learning new dances and socializing with friends, family and healthcare providers.

More Details

Demographic findings (note: not all add up to 121 as participants left some areas blank)

  • Participant total, age, gender: 121 total;
    adults 88% (most age 19-64); children 12% (less than age 19);
    females 75%, males 25%, 1 in transition (transgender)
  • Diabetes type: 32 people with type 2 diabetes; 2 with type 1; 16 with prediabetes; 16 unknown type; 1 with history gestational diabetes
  • Support: 34% of attendees came to support others with the disease. This is a significant finding showing the need for programs that include the support system for people with diabetes.
  • Ethnic / racial breakdown:
    47 African Americans or 42% (S.F. population 8%)
    31 Asian Americans/3 Middle Eastern or 30% (S.F. population 31%)
    19 Hispanic/Latinos or 17% (S.F. population 14%)
    10 White/Caucasian or 9% (S.F. population 50%)
    4 “other” or 2%
  • Special characteristics: included 5 physically disabled, 7 using a cane, 2 with wheelchairs, 8 visually impaired, 6 LGBT (lesbian gay bisexual transgender), 24 ESL (Spanish, Cantonese, Korean, Russian, others unknown), 6 “other” (not described).

Health Profile of Participants

     a. Global findings (note – participants who returned have special section below):

  • Total metrics assessed: A1Cs 83; glucose checks 168; blood pressures 116; heights / weights 110.
  • Diabetes treatment: 27 on diabetes pills, 31 using diet/exercise, 6 on insulin (1 noted OmniPod pump, another syringe and vial), 5 on other injectables (Byetta, Victoza, Symlin), and 1 using a continuous glucose monitor.
  • A1C average: for people with prediabetes and diabetes 6.3% (highest values, 8.4% and 11.8%); A1C average for all participants 5.9%.
  • Pre-dance vs. post-dance glucose averages: For people with diabetes, pre-dance glucose average was 134, with post-dance 114 average (20 mg/dL drop on average).
  • Hypoglycemic episodes requiring treatment: three (lowest value 62 mg/dL).
  • Blood pressure (BP) average:
    For people with diabetes, BP average 125/78. For total population, BP average 123/79.
    Total participants with BP above the ADA goal of <130/80 significant: 57 of 116 (or 49%).
  • BMI average: of 30.6 total population
  • Quality of Life Score: average was 7.32 out of 10 (no difference in average between people with or without diabetes). 

     b. Return participant findings

  • A1C average:
    69% of returning participants’ A1C either lowered or stayed the same. Of those, the average drop was 0.5% (largest drop was 1%) with the highest value being 6.5%.
    31% of returning participants increased A1C by 0.4% (to values between 5.5 – 6.3, with one value of 7.2%, all arguably within targets).
  • Pre-dance vs. post-dance glucose averages:
    Pre-dance glucose average was 128 mg/dL (7 points lower that total population), with post-dance of 108 mg/dL (6 points lower than total population average, with the same 20 mg/dL drop on average). Return participants have lower glucose values.
  • Blood pressure:
    24 out of 52 BPs taken had values above 130/80. That’s 46% for people who returned for more than 1 session (compared to 49% of the total population in attendance).
 People who came back had lowered systolic BP (the top number) by 15 points, and 8 people had lowered diastolic BP (the bottom number) by 11 points average respectively. The lowest improved value was 109/64; the highest (but improved) value was 143/78. For return participants with BP above 130/80, 77% improved BP; 23% did not.
  • BMI average post program:
    28.6 (vs. 30.6 of total population) . Of those with BMI more than 30, 17% of returnees had 5% weight loss; 93% or returnees lost weight or remained weight neutral; most loss 13 lbs.
  • Average Quality of Life Score:
    was 7.34 out of 10 (no statistical difference in average from total population).
  • Increase in exercise frequency from baseline:
    Stayed the same (20%); increased (80%).

Special thanks to all participants and their support, our donors, volunteers, and Board of Directors.

Here is a little video of Kang sharing how the program helped him.

The entire transcript is also posted here: “How has Dance Out Diabetes helped you? OK. Before the dance, I only do the walking in the fields and on the street. But after (joining in) the dance (Out Diabetes), I started to join in other dances like the Zumba class. Also, I started going to the fitness center in the fitness room on the 2nd floor (at Bayview Hunters Point Y). I never have done that before. I have been doing fitness at least four times a week. In other words, the diabetes dances inspire me to study other (types of) exercise. Wonderful. Thank you! You’re welcome.”

(To see the transcript during the video, press play button first, then click on the “show annotations” icon, located in between CC and 360P icons, in the toolbar below the video image.)

Summarized by Theresa Garnero, APRN, BC-ADM, MSN, CDE, Principal Investigator